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Slowing Australian economy to reduce number of migrant places

Chris Evans slowing economy forces immigration cutsAn interesting post made on our forums has been getting quite a bit of attention recently.

The story goes that Chris Evans, the Australian Immigration minister has announced that Australia will cut its annual immigration intake for the first time in eight years due to the slowing economy and weakening demand for labour.

The story posted on “The Age” website quotes Chris Evans as saying:

“I expect the numbers of our programme to drop next year … as a reaction to the economic circumstances… It is fair to say that we expect the demand in the economy for labour to reduce. As it is a program very much linked to the demand for labour, we expect to run a smaller program.”

Australia has been accepting immigrants in record numbers in recent years and set a target for 190,300 immigrants this year, up 20% on the 2007-08 financial year and higher than the post world war II record of 185,099 in 1969-70.

About one in four of Australia’s 21 million people were born overseas, and Australia has been actively trying to attract skilled workers, with immigration fairs targetting university graduates and people with trades in Europe, Britain and India.   Then this thing  called the ‘  credit crunch’ started!

What does this mean for you?

Well,   Evans has  said that the final number of immigrants that Australia would accept has yet to be determined so hopefully this will mean that the 2009 intake will not be effected.

The Aussie government intend to make a final decision leading up to the national budget to be delivered on May 12.

As always,  as soon as we have this news, we’ll report it here at getting down under.

Written by Mark

Profile photo of Mark

As the founder of Getting Down Under, Mark is passionate about demystifying the process associated with a move to Australia.

Having launched Getting Down Under in early January 2006 and made the move to Australia from the UK in the same year, Mark continues to share resources and support for those looking for assitance, Getting Down Under.

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