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Australia increases skilled migrant quota

Good news for people looking to emigrate to Australia under one of the Skilled Visa Classes.

According to a media release made on Wednesday, Australia is issuing more Australian visas to skilled migrants than ever.

The level of migration for 2007-08 will be set at a whopping 152,800 places. This includes an increase of 5,000 places in the Skilled Migration Stream (SMS), with a total of 102,500 places.

The increase reflects the labour shortages being experienced by Australia in many highly skilled job sectors.

This year’s Australian visa quota also reinforces the Australian government’s focus on strengthening the economy by keeping pace with the demand for skilled workers.

This is good news for wannabe migrants interested in Australian immigration who have work experience and sound English language skills that will enable them to get an Australian skilled visa.

More Australian visas were issued to IT professionals (4,290) in the nine months to March 31st 2007 than during the entire previous year, according to the Department of Immigration and Citizenship. The number of visas is heading for an increase of 35 per cent this year.

Australian visas issued to the spouses and partners of skilled migrants have also increased. During the 2006-07 year the number of partner visas in the family scheme was increased by 4,000 places. The minister announced that this level (a total of 50,000 places) will be maintained in the Migration Programme for 2007-08. The increased mobility of young professionals has created a higher demand for partner visas.

Part of the reason for the increase in visas is the country’s solid economic performance. Australia’s economy grew by 2.8 per cent in the final three months of 2006, fuelled by increasing household spending and a mining boom benefiting from higher commodity prices.

It makes you wonder how many people will now qualify following the changes to the general skilled program which comes into effect from next month though. I also hope that the Aussie government has taken into account the impact a surge of skilled workers may have on the house prices here in Australia.



Written by Mark

As the founder of Getting Down Under, Mark is passionate about demystifying the process associated with a move to Australia.
Having launched Getting Down Under in early January 2006 and made the move to Australia from the UK in the same year, Mark continues to share resources and support for those looking for assitance, Getting Down Under.

If you have a question for Mark, please post in our Forums

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  1. Stephen, I see your point around the language capabilities of some Asian Migrants (and Migrants from other non English speaking countries) but I think the Aussie Government recognises this to. :)

    I’d imagine the introduction of the IELTS exam as part of the Australian Immigaration process will see the level of competency in the English Language will increase significantly for new migrants.

  2. The current levels of Immigration are unsustainable. Governements are not keeping up with the increases in population. There is a housing shortage in NSW. Hospitals, schools, roads and traffic,water,and other Government services are stretched to the limit, all because funding has not been increased to meet demand. As well, an increase in population will equate to an increase in our carbon emissions.

    The other problem is that there are too many Asians coming into the country. Many suburbs are already dominated by Asian populations and are increasingly demonstrating that they do not want to intergrate into Australian society. Ashfield NSW is a good example, where 60% of the population is of Chinese descent. Most of these people have been here for 5 years, yet cannot speak English. This is unacceptable. Most Australians accept and even embrace multiculturalism, but this example is monoculturalism, and one where Australians are discriminated against.

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